Harold Sipe has worked on top tier mobile, casual and social game titles. He has acted as the creative vision holder and project manager for games produced in partnership with such licensors as Paramount Pictures, National Geographic, Lifetime TV and others.

Here we go again; scientists talking in Star Trek terms, making Trek tech an impending reality. Today’s case in point is news out of Alabama that the University of Alabama (in Huntsville’s Aerophysics Research Center), NASA, Boeing and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are joining forces to produce nuclear fusion impulse rocket engines. Say it with us: Impulse engines! Imagine a spacecraft venturing from Earth to Mars… in just six weeks. Imagine it happening by 2030, as that’s the goal. And if you have any doubt that scientists behind the project don’t recognize the Trek connection at hand here, just read the following quote. “Star Trek fans love it, especially when we call the concept an impulse drive, which is what it is,” team member Ross Cortez, an aerospace engineering Ph.D. candidate at UAH’s Aerophysics Research Center, told Txchnologist. Cortez added, “The fusion fuel we’re focusing on is deuterium [a stable isotope of hydrogen] and Li6 [a stable isotope of the metal lithium] in a crystal structure. That’s basically dilithium crystals we’re using.” (via Star Trek Impluse Engines To Be A Reality By 2030?)

Here we go again; scientists talking in Star Trek terms, making Trek tech an impending reality. Today’s case in point is news out of Alabama that the University of Alabama (in Huntsville’s Aerophysics Research Center), NASA, Boeing and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory are joining forces to produce nuclear fusion impulse rocket engines. Say it with us: Impulse engines! Imagine a spacecraft venturing from Earth to Mars… in just six weeks. Imagine it happening by 2030, as that’s the goal. And if you have any doubt that scientists behind the project don’t recognize the Trek connection at hand here, just read the following quote. “Star Trek fans love it, especially when we call the concept an impulse drive, which is what it is,” team member Ross Cortez, an aerospace engineering Ph.D. candidate at UAH’s Aerophysics Research Center, told Txchnologist. Cortez added, “The fusion fuel we’re focusing on is deuterium [a stable isotope of hydrogen] and Li6 [a stable isotope of the metal lithium] in a crystal structure. That’s basically dilithium crystals we’re using.” (via Star Trek Impluse Engines To Be A Reality By 2030?)

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